Testimonials

Generally, I don’t read that much fiction as I usually stick to history.  You have a gift for writing with a real talent for cross-cultural complexities as they play out in personal relationships.  I particularly liked the genre….both the time frame (interesting period/span of world history) and the choice of the Eastern Caribbean, something of a geographic side-bar which is quite unfamiliar to most.  Off hand, I thing the  work could serve as the basis of a nice Netflix series, perhaps slightly adjusting to a more familiar geographic setting.  Personally, I liked the setting the way it is.   ~  BRS, Official, U.S. Department of State (retired)

I had to wait for my wife to read the book first. The sex scenes got her by surprise. |  I was once told that there is more history in fiction then in non-fiction.  Your book proves that.  The book is truly historical; scholarly, and I have to re-read some parts because there is so much in it. I enjoyed multiple references by all the major religions and their accuracy. Your treatment of the religions of the world did not surprise me as you had those interests when you were attending the Panama Canal College in La Boca.  |  The story I liked, and I will re-read for the multiple messages that you convey. I have that feeling there was too much to absorb factually.)  I am very proud of your accomplishments.   ~  Joseph Patrick Kane, Librarian, Panama Canal Collge, La Boca, Canal Zone, Panama (retired); author’s mentor

I found it easy to immerse myself in this intriguing historical novel (with informative footnotes). Do not let the title of the book, Daughters of the Dance, fool you. With a focus on the Sephardic-Ladino community of Curacao and the menace of two World Wars as backdrop, the book becomes epic-like in scope yet never loses its intimacy. ~ Thomas Armentano, Ph.D., Botanist

I read the book which was very informative, and you obviously did lots of research. It has grand themes, to be sure. I enjoyed it’s story very much.., the history of the Sephardic family was most interesting to me…. At three hundred pages…it took me time to read and see the direction you were taking, but that’s just me. I think you should now contact the Sephardic community blogs and Jewish magazines for getting a book review. Think they would find this historical aspect most interesting…. ~  Neil Thomas Evan, Panama City, Panama

I finished the book today! I’ve been up since 3:45 reading. I really couldn’t put it down.
It was so upsetting when […] died!  |  The book is really remarkable Armida … I love how layered it is with all of the history and technical details and religion/spiritual aspects, the dancing and art/craft and sensuality. All of the relationships and details of how the people are connected in so many ways.   |  A lot of aspects of it were personal to me, […] having […] and when they scattered her ashes and … […] dying was so sad! I did have tears several times reading the book, it is very gripping. I really think you’ve written something wonderful!! ❤ So glad I got to read it. ~ Kathi Petersen, Nova Scotia, Canada  http://pufferbellies.ca

 

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Reviews by ONLINEBOOKCLUB

goldstarFor an author to seek the review of a web site that offers an independent review of her novel is risky business but welcomed. Following are two reviews:

Following is the official OnlineBookClub review of Daughters of the Dance that received four out of four stars! (reprinted)

Book Cover


4 out of 4 stars


 

“Hardly had I come across a book that combined history, love, war, slavery and spirituality into one beautiful story. Daughters Of The Dance by Armida Nagy Rose is one of them. The story is about a family of female dancers Dara, Ayana and Nona living in Curacao Island.

“Ayana woke up after two years of suspended mental state. She suffered from severe depression after getting departed from her husband, Stefan. Sandor, who was the complete opposite of Stefan, always had sexual intentions towards Ayana. He separated the two lovebirds at the time of World War 2. Ayana, who was bearing the child of Stefan, went back to her mother Dara and gave birth to Nona. Time passed, and Nona grew to be a beautiful young lady. She fell in love with a handsome young man, Ariel. Sandor became a powerful barrister and a candidate for a judgeship in the Dutch Antilles. However, his days of happiness were soon going to be over. Awiti, who was the slave of Sandor, was often sexually exploited by him. She couldn’t tolerate more when she came to know that her daughter had a relationship with Sandor. She made a plan, and with the help of Yellie, she taught Sandor a lesson. After completing her PhD in Art History, Nona soon married the love of her life and gave birth to a child Myra. They moved to Trinidad and lived happily thereafter.

“The life of Dara, Ayana and Nona were captivating. The story was heartbreaking but also inspiring. The plight of slaves, especially women of the mid-20th century was disheartening to read. Also, the mass murder of Jews during World War 2 was covered very well. Stefan was one of the victims because he was a Jew. The Geopolitics of different European nations during that time was elaborately discussed to make the story more relatable. Even though the story is transpiring at the time of a war, it has a strong spiritual dimension to it. Ayana is portrayed as a very spiritual lady. According to Ayana, her dance is a way to experience the divine. Even sex is a tool for her to experience bliss and ultimate union. I think Ayana was the most well-developed character in the book. Other characters such as Dara, Nona, Sandor, Stefan and Ariel were also developed well. The book was very informative. It had everything such as Art, History, Politics, Eastern Philosophy, Religion and Spirituality. The author must be an expert in History to write all those things. There are different languages used in the book such as Dutch, German, Ladino, Papiamentu and Spanish. However, the meanings of these words are given at the end of every chapter. I struggled to understand those words because I was reading a Kindle version of the book.

“There is a little about the book that I disliked. It felt that the ending was overstretched. The story could have ended earlier because Sandor was punished and almost everything was sorted out. But it’s entirely my opinion and other readers can differ on that aspect. The book was mostly error-free. I spotted minor typos here and there that hardly affected the reading experience. I found some unusual bold letters in the book. Overall, the book was enjoyable and informative.

“I rate this book 4 out of 4 stars. The minor typos didn’t really affect the quality of the book. Hence, the score must be 4 out of 4. The book is recommended to those who like art, history or love stories. There is a lot of sexual content in the book. So children should stay away from it.”  ONLINEBOOKCLUB Testimonials


A member reader submitted a comment on the review, wishing to remain anonymous, wrote the following:

Having read this novel in November 2018, I was pleased to see Daughters of the Dance, a Mosaic of Seek & Find (316 pages) featured when I was looking for historical novels to read. As a boomer, I’d like to offer additional perspectives from that of younger generations. The reviewer is right that “the story is heartbreaking but also inspiring.”

The beginning chapter about Ayana being in a state of limbo for two years and waking from a dream state is a metaphor for suffering that suppresses our minds from the simple fact that we intrinsically exist. Ayana suffered such deep depression veiled as catatonia (a psychomotor disturbance); and when she came out of it, she was a transformed person. In the first chapter you learn about the family of three women dancers. In the second chapter, you learn about the three Sephardic Jews of the Dutch elite of Curaçao. Afterwards, the book becomes a look into the past, back to the present, and then into the future.

The early historical context of the Ladino Jews from Spain and the Spanish Netherlands, migrating to the Caribbean, to the Netherlands Antilles, and coastal Latin America was new to me. I also learned about how refined oil from the refineries in Curaçao helped the Allies actual victory in the Mediterranean theatre during World War II. Moreover, the Nazis were everywhere, including the Americas, waiting to take over the world’s resources.

In telling the story, the reader is introduced to five beautiful and struggling romantic encounters. Every bit of the characters’ lives can be interpreted in terms of existential psychology that the author’s artistry manages to broaden one’s mindfulness. I must admit my favorite romance was between Andries and Dara; their intimacy silently engulfed them completely for decades. Andries, the principal male character, is an intelligence officer skilled in maritime trade for the Crown Queen of the Netherlands and the Netherlands Antilles and was not mentioned in the official review.

As for the ending, the symbolic daughters of the dance evolve over three generations in search of meaning. It had to end with Ariel’s bond to Nona, the one who cracks the code of non-dual existence.

Successfully ambitious, the novel is daring and caring in its complexity and mindful to the very end. One of my favorite authors, Rebecca Goldstein, wrote, “art is supposed to increase our mindfulness.” Daughter of the Dance; a Mosaic of Seek and Find, does just that, especially piercing dualistic sexuality in search for the ineffable experience of Oneness. Somehow, the mystical undertones of the novel are contemplative and Kabbalistic in seeking authenticity and truth. If I understand the author’s boldness in treating sexual content, which permeates our mental energy, sends a message—one cannot and should not be attached or adverse to its divine energy. Nature’s Half Acre

From South Florida, a Friend’s Comments

“I bought the book. But I want to buy another. I like the idea that I can order it as a gift to you and then you will sign it and sent it to me! You are very talented!!!! You had to do quite a bit of research for this book. No wonder it took several years….

“I ordered the book for you to sign. You should get it on Sunday. Still reading and loving the book, even with the sexually explicit narratives. 🙂

“I can’t believe Stefan died!

Testimonials

“I finished the book. Very good.

“I was right about Nona, I think, her premonition.

“By the way, you did capture the journey of life, its intricacies, its ups and downs, feelings, etc. Well done. I loved the inclusion of dance, history (including of Jews in the Netherland Antilles), and philosophy (Buddhism).”

She also sent me the link to the web site she learned about the book:  BroadwayWorld 

 

W e l c o m e

AVAILABLE NOW IN PAPERBACK (quality Soft Cover edition) and E-book format:  From BARNES & NOBLEAMAZON, INDIGO, BOOK DEPOSITORY, ALIBRIS, iTunes, Google Play

e-Book from PAGE PUBLISHING (New York) IS NOW AVAILABLE for purchase!


A quote from someone who read Daughters of the Dance—

            Engaging….Don’t let the title..fool you. In the author’s debut novel, Armida reveals an uncanny ability to create believable, complex characters and to develop them within a historical setting, which she has ably constructed. – TVA                   


Dealing with adult and controversial themes, Daughters of the Dance is a beautiful, moving saga of three generations of strong women immersed in the art of the dance and in their profound relationships with high-powered men driven by oil, wealth, war, trade, religious beliefs, nature, female submissiveness, and sexual boundaries. It is a story of uncharted survival amid three wars in continental Europe during the first half of the twentieth century and its inevitable expansion to the Netherlands Antilles, especially the Sephardic-Ladino community of Curaçao, and to the Western Hemisphere.

For the Author’s Review (backstory) of the novel, click HERE.

Daughters of the Dance is a metaphor for a method the “daughters” use to enhance their spiritual being. Ayana, the introductory character, expresses a dominant human condition—the pain of sadness, guilt, and shame—and asks, “How do we survive without love?” In the words of Rumi, a Persian Sufi, “Whosoever knows the power of dance, dwells in God” (i.e., the Ineffable Effulgence,a non-reified Presence), they discover their primordial selves—originated, born, formed, and unfiltered. At a deeper level, the characters encounter lo real maravilloso americano (magic realism) in raw, latent, and ever-present states of being in elegant timelessness. In a way, Rumi pointed the way, “What you seek is seeking you.”

Daughters of the Dance invites the reader to grasp the mystery that lies behind each personality. Words and pictographs fail to fully explain experience. Hence, the novel challenges beliefs so that readers can seek out the experience of beauty and joy amid the perils of unrest that may either fester or heal. To borrow Rumi again, “Dance when you are perfectly free and enjoy each step along the way.”

Happy is the culture that is allowed to dance!320px-Spiral_Goddess_symbol_neo-pag


For author’s brief biography, click on AUTHOR.

For TESTIMONIALS.  Testimonials


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